CWC News

Mitsubishi Electric, Nokia Bell Labs, UCSD develop first ultra-fast GaN envelope-tracking power amplifier for next-gen wireless base stations

Friday, May 19, 2017

High-speed operation of envelope-tracking power amplifier will help reduce energy consumption of next-generation wireless base stations

TowerJazz and UC San Diego Demonstrate Best in Class 5G Mobile Transmit-Receive Chips with Greater than 12 Gbps Data Rates

Thursday, February 23, 2017

NEWPORT BEACH and SAN DIEGO, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 – TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and the University of California San Diego, a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave, mixed-signal RFICs, and phased arrays, demonstrate for the first time a greater than 12 Gbps, 5G phased-array chip set.  This chip set demonstrates that products can be fabricated today to meet the emerging 5G telecommunications standards for the next wave of worldwide mobile communications. The chipset operates at 28 to 31 GHz, a new communications band planned for release by the FCC.

'Near-perfect' broadband absorber invented

Thursday, February 9, 2017

By Liezel Labios, UC San Diego

Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection.

These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego.

5G at 60 GHz sets data rate record at 2 Gbps at 300 m, 4 Gbps at 100 m

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Keysight Technologies with the University of California San Diego have announced the longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees.

Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

The Secret (Code) for Getting Kids Excited About Engineering

Friday, October 7, 2016

San Diego, Calif., Oct. 7, 2016 — You can find publications written by Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Pamela Cosman in the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, the International Journal of Computer Vision and, as of this past May, in the children’s section of the UC San Diego bookstore.

Flexible Wearable Electronic Skin Patch Offers New Way to Monitor Alcohol Levels

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

By Liezel Labios

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.

Dreaming Big at the 5G Wireless Forum and Connected Health Workshop

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

by Tiffany Fox

The latest technological advance to excite not only computer engineers but business executives and physicians is…. a set of telecommunications standards?

Technically, yes. But it’s the potential offered by 5G (fifth generation) wireless -- the standard emerging as a replacement for 4G -- that has everyone talking. And talking big.

IoT Initiative: From Industrial IoT to Smart Cities

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

The vision of the CWC at UC San Diego is to start a mutually beneficial collaboration with KETI (Korea Electronics Technology Institute) that will employ smart techniques in what is called “factory-things.” “The transformation of manufacturing with IoTs will help the U.S. maintain its competitive edge in the manufacturing industries,” says CWC Director Sujit Dey,  “with increased efficiencies in cost, processes, manufacturing and performance.”

What exactly is Industrial IoT?

A Cloud-based Mobile Health Monitoring and Real-time Guidance System

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Currently, most physical therapy patients receive only verbal and written instructions for their  at-home care -- a strategy that lacks the benefit of the direct feedback a physical therapist could provide. Not surprisingly, this strategy yields very low rates of compliance and accuracy. The Center for Wireless Communications’ mHealth Initiative aims to provide detailed guidance to physical therapy patients so that the exercise regimen they do at home can be as effective as what they do in the clinic.

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